The sequel This Is Spinal Tap reunites Harry Shearer, Christopher Guest and Michael McKean

The sequel This Is Spinal Tap reunites Harry Shearer, Christopher Guest and Michael McKean

It’s Spinal Tap II, a sequel to the 1984 comedy This Is Spinal Tap, is set to hit screens in 2024, with Rob Reiner returning to the director’s chair.

The sequel to the cult-classic mockumentary will reunite the film’s original stars Harry Shearer, Christopher Guest and Michael McKean.

The film will be the first release from Castle Rock Entertainment’s revived film division, Deadline reported Thursday.

The sequel This Is Spinal Tap reunites Harry Shearer, Christopher Guest and Michael McKean

The Latest: It’s Spinal Tap II, a sequel to the 1984 comedy This Is Spinal Tap, is set to hit screens in 2024, with Rob Reiner returning to the director’s chair. (LR) Harry Shearer, Christopher Guest, Michael McKean and Reiner starred in a still from the original film

The film’s premise follows the impersonated English heavy metal trio of Derek Smalls (Shearer), Nigel Tufnel (guest) and David St. Hubbins (McKean), with Reiner reprising his role as filmmaker Marty DiBergi.

Reiner, 75, told Deadline there has been a demand for the sequel for years, but it wasn’t until he, Shearer, Guest and McKean developed a strong concept for the sequel that he decided to go ahead.

“The plan is to do a sequel to come out on the 40th anniversary of the original film, and I can tell you that hardly a day goes by without someone saying, ‘Why don’t you do another one?'” he said. “We’ve said ‘no’ for so many years.

“Not until we had the right idea of ​​how to do it. You don’t want to just do it, do it. You want to honor the first one and push it a little further with the story.’

The film's premise follows the impersonated English heavy metal trio of Derek Smalls (Shearer), Nigel Tufnel (guest) and David St. Hubbins (McKean).

The film’s premise follows the impersonated English heavy metal trio of Derek Smalls (Shearer), Nigel Tufnel (guest) and David St. Hubbins (McKean).

The film was selected for preservation by the National Film Registry in 2002 because the Library of Congress declared it

The film was selected for preservation by the National Film Registry in 2002 because the Library of Congress declared it “culturally, historically, and aesthetically significant.”

Reiner has been open about the plot of the upcoming film as the band is under pressure to reunite for a final concert.

“They’ve played at the Albert Hall and Wembley Stadium, across the country and in Europe,” Reiner told Deadline. “They haven’t been spending time together lately and that became the premise. The idea was that Ian Faith, who was her manager, died. In reality, Tony Hendra (the actor who played Faith) passed away.

“Ian’s widow inherited a contract that says Spinal Tap owes them a concert. She would basically sue them if they didn’t. All these years and a lot of bad blood we get in and they get thrown back together and forced to confront each other and play this concert.

Reiner has been open about reprising his role as Marty DiBergi, the director of the original film, which “the band was upset about.

“They thought I did a hoe job and this is a chance to redeem myself,” Reiner said. “I’m such a huge fan and I felt bad that they didn’t like what they saw in the first film. When I heard they might get back together, I was a guest assistant at the Ed Wood School of Cinematic Arts. I drop everything to document this final concert.”

Gast, Shearer, McKean and Reiner posed for a photo during a screening of the original film at the 2019 Tribeca Film Festival in NYC

Gast, Shearer, McKean and Reiner posed for a photo during a screening of the original film at the 2019 Tribeca Film Festival in NYC

The film was Reiner's first attempt at directing as he has amassed an impressive catalog of theatrical releases in the 38 years since

The film was Reiner’s first attempt at directing as he has amassed an impressive catalog of theatrical releases in the 38 years since

The original film is scheduled to be screened at the Cannes Film Festival on Wednesday as part of the Cinema de la Plage programme.

The film was selected for preservation by the National Film Registry in 2002 because the Library of Congress declared it “culturally, historically, and aesthetically significant.”

Reiner recalled how confused audiences were when the original film was first shown in Dallas.

“People came up to me and said, ‘I don’t understand why you would make a film about a band that nobody has heard of and is so bad. Why would you do that?” he said. “I said it’s satire and I’d explain it, but it took a while for people to understand. Now it’s in the National Film Registry.”

The film was Reiner’s first attempt at directing as he has amassed an impressive catalog of theatrical releases in the 38 years since. These include Stand by Me, The Princess Bride, When Harry Met Sally…, Misery and A Few Good Men, which earned the filmmaker an Oscar nomination for Best Picture.

Spinal Tap II is slated to hit theaters on March 19, 2024.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.